UPCOMING Exhibition

 

November 11    -   December 23, 2017

at the

Orange County Center for Contemporary Art
"Portraiture - An Exhibition"

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 11, 2017, from 5 PM - 8 PM

curated by Shane Guffogg, the exhibiting artists include Don Bachardy, Xander Berkeley, Jeff Britton, Shane Guffogg, Laura Hipke, Doro Hofmann, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Deborah Martin, Ed Ruscha, Paul Ruscha, Vonn Sumner and Alison Van Pelt.

PRESS RELEASE        (includes images and essay on each artist in short here -> )

 OCCCA  .com            (more information on the venue) 

 

Doro-Hofmann-LOST-ICON#3-small.jpg

 

"Doro Hofmann's painting technique is pain staking photo-realism, infused with symbols of our post-modern, capitol-driven world. She paints beauty, as in women and shiny objects, but they are more than that. She is really painting a belief system that we are all too familiar with. When we pick up a magazine and look at the glassy pages of ads, they are trying to tell us and hopefully sell us, their concept of happiness. That concept is based on the idea that if you buy their product, lets say a purse from Gucci, you will be one of them – one of the beautiful, happy people. It is consumerism combined with marketing with a splash of religious iconography (think of the Virgin Mary with a halo, blue robe, red dress and the bluest skies) that makes us want to buy with the hope of belonging to their world. The message is, beauty equals happiness. Simple enough but oh how complicated it all is.

Doro's women, with their prefect blue hair, look out in to our world, but not necessarily at us. They are daydreaming against a back drop of diamonds and gold, but they are disconnected from both our world and theirs. They are fallen angels that have been seduced into our belief system, trapped in a timeless state of idealized beauty.

These paintings are really portraits born out of desire, fueled by the (social) media. They are steeped in the history of European Icon paintings of the late Byzantine and early Renaissance and are as real as the images that are splashed across our TV and computer screens of today's hot celebs wearing the latest high fashion statement. We know they don't have a solution for world hunger or world peace, but we watch and listen anyway because these pop cultural icons, represent an idea that we all want to believe in – eternal beauty."

Shane Guffogg, 2016

 

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For Immediate Release Orange County Center for Contemporary Art presents “PORTRAITURE - AN EXHIBITION” Curated by Shane Guffogg November 11th - December 22nd, 2017 Opening Reception: Saturday, November 11, 2017, from 5 PM - 8 PM SANTA ANA, CA - Orange County Center for Contemporary Art presents, "Portraiture - An Exhibition" Curated by Shane Guffogg A group exhibition featuring paintings, mixed media, and drawings by Southern California and Internationally acclaimed artists. In alphabetical order, Xander Berkeley, Don Bachardy, Jeff Britton, Shane Guffogg, Laura Hipke, Doro Hofmann, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Deborah Martin, Ed Ruscha, Paul Ruscha, Vonn Sumner and Alison Van Pelt.   Portraiture goes back in time to the stone ages (some 30,000 plus years ago) and continues all the way through to today. Images of the human face have served as a vessel to carry ideas of who we were – and are – throughout the centuries, ranging from the idealized forms of the Sumerians and Egyptians, to the naturalized images of Greeks and Romans and back again to stylized images of the Byzantine era, only to find a new idealized form of realism in the 1400’s, now commonly known as the Renaissance. Each style change was prompted or accompanied by a change of ideas of how the people thought about their world and their place in it. By the beginning of the 20th century, Picasso's portraits had run the full gamut of every style that had preceded him until he took his cue from the new ideas of science (relativity) and began fragmenting his images, creating multiple views, simultaneously.  And then there is Andy Warhol and his use of photography and screen printing to replicate the mid 20th century's world of images, showing us not only how we see but how the images are made. That leads us up to today. But one big difference between where we are now versus where we were, even 10 years ago, is that throughout history there have been trends that get coined as an “Ism” like French Impressionism. But in our technologically driven-age, there is no one style or idea that dominates the artistic landscape.  information, in fact, it is just the opposite because now with a click of the mouse or keypad, virtually any image from anywhere in the world is available. I like to think of the computer screen as a portal into a 4th dimension where the past and present are all there, existing simultaneously. So what does that do to art and more to the point, portraiture? The answer, in part, is that any and all artistic styles are available to draw from. Until now, there really has not been any rules that claim what is fashionable or relevant. The main objective of portraiture, as best I can figure, is to really see ourselves – both physically and emotionally, and hopefully gain insight and understanding into what we call the Human Condition. Portraiture is much more than capturing a likeness of someone. It goes deep into our past like an underground river, resurfacing as our future. The artists and artworks I have chosen for the Portrait exhibition at Orange County Center for Contemporary Art add to a larger picture that is both a vision of our reality and a psychological reflection of what that reality is. I admire what these artists are doing – making images- which is a tradition and form of communication that is as old as humanity itself. Some of these artists tell stories, others imply stories, others depict a moment as fact. Some capture that moment with a gestural brush stroke that becomes a visual metaphor. In some, the colors are pushed into a seemingly different dimension. And some look like a strange scene from a film that was (maybe) never made. They all add up to what I think of as a snapshot that is being driven by a need to understand and reflect on what it means to be human in the beginning of the 21st century. Curator – Shane Guffogg

For Immediate Release

Orange County Center for Contemporary Art presents

“PORTRAITURE - AN EXHIBITION” Curated by Shane Guffogg
November 11th - December 22nd, 2017
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 11, 2017, from 5 PM - 8 PM

SANTA ANA, CA - Orange County Center for Contemporary Art presents, "Portraiture - An Exhibition" Curated by Shane Guffogg

A group exhibition featuring paintings, mixed media, and drawings by Southern California and Internationally acclaimed artists.

In alphabetical order,

Xander Berkeley, Don Bachardy, Jeff Britton, Shane Guffogg, Laura Hipke, Doro Hofmann, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Deborah Martin, Ed Ruscha, Paul Ruscha, Vonn Sumner and Alison Van Pelt.  

Portraiture goes back in time to the stone ages (some 30,000 plus years ago) and continues all the way through to today. Images of the human face have served as a vessel to carry ideas of who we were – and are – throughout the centuries, ranging from the idealized forms of the Sumerians and Egyptians, to the naturalized images of Greeks and Romans and back again to stylized images of the Byzantine era, only to find a new idealized form of realism in the 1400’s, now commonly known as the Renaissance.

Each style change was prompted or accompanied by a change of ideas of how the people thought about their world and their place in it. By the beginning of the 20th century, Picasso's portraits had run the full gamut of every style that had preceded him until he took his cue from the new ideas of science (relativity) and began fragmenting his images, creating multiple views, simultaneously. 

And then there is Andy Warhol and his use of photography and screen printing to replicate the mid 20th century's world of images, showing us not only how we see but how the images are made.

That leads us up to today. But one big difference between where we are now versus where we were, even 10 years ago, is that throughout history there have been trends that get coined as an “Ism” like French Impressionism. But in our technologically driven-age, there is no one style or idea that dominates the artistic landscape.  information, in fact,

it is just the opposite because now with a click of the mouse or keypad, virtually any image from anywhere in the world is available. I like to think of the computer screen as a portal into a 4th dimension where the past and present are all there, existing simultaneously.

So what does that do to art and more to the point, portraiture? The answer, in part, is that any and all artistic styles are available to draw from. Until now, there really has not been any rules that claim what is fashionable or relevant. The main objective of portraiture, as best I can figure, is to really see ourselves – both physically and emotionally, and hopefully gain insight and understanding into what we call the Human Condition.

Portraiture is much more than capturing a likeness of someone. It goes deep into our past like an underground river, resurfacing as our future. The artists and artworks I have chosen for the Portrait exhibition at Orange County Center for Contemporary Art add to a larger picture that is both a vision of our reality and a psychological reflection of what that reality is. I admire what these artists are doing – making images- which is a tradition and form of communication that is as old as humanity itself.

Some of these artists tell stories, others imply stories, others depict a moment as fact. Some capture that moment with a gestural brush stroke that becomes a visual metaphor. In some, the colors are pushed into a seemingly different dimension. And some look like a strange scene from a film that was (maybe) never made.

They all add up to what I think of as a snapshot that is being driven by a need to understand and reflect on what it means to be human in the beginning of the 21st century.

Curator – Shane Guffogg


current


past

2016

»  "Portraiture - An Exhibition" at the Lindsay Museum; curated by Shane Guffogg.   PRESS RELEASE     The Porterville Recorder   

 

2012

»  "21st annual Images of the Virgin Exhibit", curated and juried by Professor of Religion at Santa Clara University: Maria Del Socorro Castaneda-Liles; at Galeria Tonantzin in San Juan Bautista, in California; in conjunction with for The Virgin Image Conference, 

December 8.  See more @  Galeria Tonantzin

 

2010

»  "Memory's Touch", curated and juried by art historians Denise Lugo and Karen Schifman; at the John Spoor Broome Library Gallery at the California State University, Channel Islands; in conjunction with California Women's Caucus for Art (SCWCA)
»  "Beauty Revisited", curated and juried by Peter Frank; at OCCCA (Orange County Center of Contemporary Art. April 29 - May 29

»  "LAKE OF FIRE" SOLO SHOW, curated by Christine Thy-Anh Vu; at Ghettogloss

 press about the show : @ CRITIQART,  CAUGULA, BEAUTIFUL DECAY,  

 

2009

»  "SALON CONTEMPORARY" a project with the "ARTART PROJECT" and curator Jeff Phillips
» “For Those of Us Still Standing” Pharmaka (current) Group have a last exhibit at Pharmaka's Gallery location,                              Downtown Los Angeles, USA.
»  "Which Way Berlin - LA ?" 6 german artist at Phantom Gallery's LA, Long Beach, 
curated by Doro Hofmann.  click here for images and here @ Phantom Gallery  

 

2008

»"Which Way Berlin - LA ?"  6 german artist present their position at Pharmaka, Downtown Los Angeles, 
curated by Doro Hofmann.  click here for images

»   “ICON” exploring how and what we worship", DCA Fine Art, Santa Monica, USA.                                        

find some press on ART SCENE

» “Group Show” Pharmaka founders show at Pharmaka, Downtown Los Angeles, USA.
»   “Blue Chips” HSH Bank, Hamburg, Germany.

 

2007
»  “Small Wonders III” a juried fundraiser to benefit Pharmaka, Non-Profit-Gallery, Downtown Los Angeles, USA.
»  “Blue Chips” HSH Bank, Hamburg, Germany.
»  “Lost Icons” Lawrence Asher Gallery, Miracle Mile, Los Angeles, USA.
»  “Now Then” Pharmaka, Downtown Los Angeles, USA.
»  "LA Ethos" a show that calls to all LA Artists, to define the Ethos of LA Art, at Pharmaka, in Los Angeles, California                                  for images click here

 

2006
»  "Small Wonders" a juried fundraiser to benefit Pharmaka, a non-profit gallery in Los Angeles, California

»  "Die Kunstreihe" selected Masterstudents exhibit at the Volksbank in Karlsruhe, Germany

»   Exhibition of Graduated Students for the Application for the Scholarship of the State Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
Doro Hofmann is granted with one of the four "Travel Grants"
 

2005
»   “LA based Artists" at Cache Contemporary, Eagle Rock, California 

»   “Top 05" at Kunstverein Heidelberg and at the Academy in Karlsruhe, Germany 

»   “2x8 Motion" at the A+D Museum (Architecture and Design) in Los Angeles, USA
 

2004
» “150 Jahre Akademie Karlsruhe” Students and Professors exhibit at the Academy in Karlsruhe, Germany

» “Lieblingsbilder" at U7 Gallery, Frankfurt , Germany

» “Busy Canvas” at Barnsdall Gallery, Barnsdall Art Park, Los Angeles , CA

» “New step in January 2004” at U7 Gallery, Frankfurt , Germany
 

2003
»  “Murals” at Pop-o-Matic, Los Angeles , CA

»   Art Walk, Don O’Melveny’s Gallery, Los Angeles , CA
 

»   Dez 2000- 2004» Annual exhibitions in conjunction with the "Akademie der Bildenden Kuenste", Karlsruhe , Germany
 

GRANTS

2006 Granted with the Travel Fellowship of the State Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
2005 Support Programme for emerging artists, the Columbus Art Foundation, Ravensburg, Germany.

 

PROJECTS

2003 - 2010  Active member of Pharmaka group and gallery, a non profit organization run by 15 artists, one
architect and one writer.

Pharmaka Gallery is dedicated to fill in the gap between museums and
commercial galleries - also to discuss any present issue about painting and art.
Pharmaka is supported by the Getty Foundation, the DEW Foundation, The Joelson Foundation
and depending on the different shows supported by the diverse cultural support programms and
foundations of the city Los Angeles.

 

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